Exhibition Environments

This past Thursday I attended the 2nd Conservation Preservation workshop presented by Cornell University, and as usual, I came out with many great tips for preparing a museum exhibition. And . . . it included a hands on lab again! Yay! I love hands on projects. Okay, so this is what we did.

First, we mounted a postcard on a mat that was slightly larger than the postcard, and strapped the corners down with mylar strips.

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On the back side, I used scotch tape to tape the mylar down. Scotch tape is okay in this case since it isn’t touching the original document:

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Looks like a big mess, huh? It doesn’t matter – nobody sees that side. And it was my first time. I like the postcard. It was designed by Pat for the Cornell libraries – where food and beverage is not allowed. Pat was our hands-on instructor for this class. I’ll blog (rant) about food and drink in libraries later.

The next is a facsimile of a postcard of a cyanotype from the Liberty Hyde Bailey collection at Cornell. Cyanotypes (and blueprints) are very sensitive to any light exposure, so you most likely won’t find originals in any exhibition.

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Since this is a copy, it doesn’t need to be protected with the mylar strips at the corners and can be slightly larger than the mat. I built a stand for it.

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And last, but not least, I built a book stand, which is specific for this book – Korean Short Stories – well, this is one book in my home I won’t be reading any time soon!

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Here’s a side view of the book stand that I designed. The book didn’t want to open up very far, which is why it isn’t flatter. The stand really is straight, the photo makes it look crooked:
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And I had to add this “z” piece to stablize the left side:

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If you want to see professional work like the examples above, check out Nevermore: The Edgar Alan Poe exhibition at Cornell University and Liberty Hyde Bailey: A Man For All Seasons at Cornell University. If you go to the bottom of each page, you can see a photo of the exhibition cases.