Half Moon Cookies

I tried looking for a while about the history of the Half Moon Cookie. I’m going to keep looking and I’ll let you know if I find it. If you have no idea what I’m even talking about, check out this excellent photo of one here. The half moon cookie seems to be a central New York tradition. When I was a kid we shopped at Green Hills Farms and every once in a while my parents would pick up some half moon cookies for us to each have one each (where you can still buy them). Oh, such joy. It is a soft cake cookie, either white or chocolate, with buttercream frosting, one half in vanilla frosting, the other half in dark chocolate frosting. I am a very picky half moon cookie connoisseur having been spoiled by the central New York version, so this is all in my humble opinion.

When I moved around I wasn’t able to find them. Until I came to my present location. And I was in a restaurant with a bakery when I first saw them! So I went up to the counter and asked for one half moon cookie please. The person at the counter had no idea what I was referring to. So I pointed to the cookie. And they said “oh, half and halves!” WTF. Half and halves? They’re half moon cookies. Well, so I ate it, and it wasn’t like the central New York half moon cookie. People, including Martha S. , half moon cookies (also called black and whites by others) don’t have hard icing and hard cake cookies. This photo shows what a hard half moon cookie looks like – ick!

BandW

This is what they *shouldn’t* look like.
This looks so unappetizing, I wouldn’t waste my time eating this.

They have *buttercream frosting*, spread on thick, don’t waste my time with a thin layer and don’t waste my time with icing. You shouldn’t be able to wrap them in plastic wrap because the frosting and soft cake cookie would stick to the plastic. Icing on them sucks. Out. Loud.

So I’m on the search for a good recipe for half moon cookies. No problem with the frosting because I have a totally to die for buttercream frosting from my Mom’s old Duncan Hines baking book. But the cake cookie part should be interesting. I’ve spent time online at the Syracuse Post-Standard archives looking for half moon cookie recipes. I’m hoping to have a good recipe in time for Valentine’s Day. Shhhh, don’t tell, okay? And blogging friends, I would be more than happy to send you some each, but like I said they can’t be wrapped if they’re made right. You have to eat them fresh.

22905629_0001-Mohican
An ad I found in the Syracuse Herald-Journal
for half moon cookies at the Mohican store
in the 1940’s for $0.30 a dozen! Mmmmm!

Soooo, have you ever heard of half moon cookies, or [cough] black and whites? Or have you ever tried making them?

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105 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. mary
    Jan 19, 2008 @ 21:00:15

    Pam, I haven’t heard of half-moon cookies but they sound delicious. In Maryland, there is a cookie company called “Berger Cookies”. They are a soft-cake cookie with loads of chocolate fudge frosting on top. Too rich for me but most people love them. Gina had a box shipped to Michael for Christmas. I hope you find your cookie!

    Reply

    • Shelley Heretyk
      Nov 07, 2009 @ 19:03:44

      Half Moon Cookies

      1 cup sour milk
      1 1/2 cups sugar
      3/4 cup shortening
      2 eggs
      1/2 tsp salt
      3 cups flour
      1 tsp baking powder
      1 tsp baking soda
      1 tsp vanilla

      Bake at 350 degrees F. 10 minutes on greased cookie sheet.

      Reply

      • Michell
        Dec 22, 2012 @ 18:23:16

        Several years later I discover this blog… My moms side are all Bostonians and I have some of my grammas homemade desserts and our family fav since I was a child are the half moon cookies, I found all her …grammas old reciepes and this was the one I have …;)

      • Shari horsley
        Jul 14, 2015 @ 19:14:23

        I think this is the recipe my mother has and if it is yes they come out so good we would make them all the time. We are from Syracuse and moved to Florida made them there and now in Missouri. My sister and mom just made some at Christmas time so good I almost ate them all my self

    • Dorothy Stevens
      Jan 29, 2010 @ 10:43:35

      I love half moon cookies, especially the ones at Harriso0ne Bakery in Syracuse New York, not too sweet, just perfect, the ones at Wegmans grocery store are way too sweet.

      Reply

      • Tammy Conklin
        Mar 21, 2010 @ 07:30:56

        Dorothy,

        I am a native New Yorker and have been a ‘Cusen for 26 years. You are 100% correct The ulimate Half Moon Cookie is from Harrison Bakery right here in Syracuse, New York.

        If anyone is looking for the Ultimate Half Moon Cookie you need to contact Harrision Bakery, if you don’t you have no idea what you are missing.

    • JLY
      Jan 26, 2012 @ 20:17:15

      Black and white cookies probably originated in central New York (where they’re called half-moons) at a Utica bakery, Hemstrought’s.

      Reply

    • a567and8
      Jul 30, 2012 @ 05:31:42

      PAM, I love your blog! I responded to your pix of the old Syracuse Boys’ Club building and recently re-connected with a friend from my child because of your photo and my response. Great!

      HALF MOON COOKIES. Yes!!! Shame on the “half and half” moniker! I ate them regularly when I first moved to Syracuse in the 1940s. I bought them from Bloom’s Bakery on Harrison Street between Almond and McBride. The cost? 2 Cents! We sometimes called them “2 cent cookies” because that was the day-old price. Yes, there is something special about the upstate New York version. I don’t even try to eat the New York City versions! They taste too much like bread! I think the concept of this cookie has been lost. It’s a shallow piece of cake best made with butter, I think. The recipe above for the frosting would work well, I think. The trick is to keep the soft cake texture and a soft frosting. Delish!

      Reply

  2. jayne
    Jan 20, 2008 @ 08:25:08

    I have never heard of them either, but then again, I am fully a G.R.I.T.S (girl raised in the South!), but if I hear of any, I’ll be sure to let you know Pam. I wonder if they are known by another name down this way? :c)

    Reply

  3. mon@rch
    Jan 20, 2008 @ 14:19:17

    hmm, look good but not sure what half I would eat first!

    Reply

  4. Pam
    Jan 20, 2008 @ 20:38:19

    Mary – mmmm, they are, when they’re made right! The cookie you described kinda sounds like it.

    Jayne – LOL! Let me know! I only know of them as half moon cookies, half and halves or black and whites.

    Mon@rch – now, there’s a trick to it that I figured out when I was a kid. Take a bite of the white side. Take a bite of the chocolate side. Continue, leaving the mix of the two in the middle, which is also an overlap of the two frostings. That makes for a perfect ending to the perfect cookie!

    Reply

  5. Apple
    Jan 20, 2008 @ 22:12:29

    I love my Half Moons! There are tons of recipes out there but I’ve found one I like. You can find it here. (I hope I did that link right.) You can sour milk with vinegar but for me they have to have real buttermilk! I use the buttermilk in the frosting too.

    Found you through Mrs. Mecomber’s place. I’m always happy to find other CNY bloggers.

    Reply

    • Holly
      Jul 14, 2015 @ 15:21:51

      Originally the recipe used sour milk, but with the extended self life of milk buttermilk is used.
      That much I know. Mom was the cook in the family

      And I had live in multiple cities and towns coast to coast black and white is how I have heard them referred. And no they don’t taste right any where else.

      Reply

  6. Bev
    Jan 31, 2008 @ 20:29:12

    Funny that you mention Halfmoon cookies. I just bought some tonight from my local market, but then again I grew up in Upstate New York so I can understand what you mean about other people not knowing about them. When I was in Florida my friends didn’t have a clue. Let us know if you find a recipe

    Reply

  7. Jay
    Feb 06, 2008 @ 15:25:29

    You will find a good receipe for black and white cookies in George Greensteins, “Secrets of a Jewish Baker,” Crossing Press 1993. The book can be located on Amazon.com if you cannot find it at your local bookstore.

    As with pizza in New York State, black and white cookies (or halfmoon cookies) take on regional differences. I’ve given friends in WNY cookies baked using Greensteins receipe and they have enjoyed them.

    Reply

  8. Casimera
    May 31, 2008 @ 16:38:33

    My heart did a little skip when I saw the ad for the Mohican…I grew up in Elmira, NY and have been trying to find the recipe for Elmira’s Mohican Market Half Moon cookies..big, soft, chocolate-y, butter cream-y, yummy, cookies that defy description of deliciousness! One thing they are not…they are not NY Black and Whites…they are only Half Moon Cookies and ne’er to be confused with those pale sisters! The search goes on for the recipe here in Ohio!

    Reply

    • sharon
      Sep 30, 2010 @ 14:28:06

      omg it was actually the mohawk market, i also gre up in elmira and still reside there, imagine my surprise at seeing this comment. remember their glazed donuts yummmmm

      Reply

  9. ann
    Jun 24, 2008 @ 13:17:17

    I grew up in Upstate NY and I ate halfmoon cookies ALL the time, we got them at Green Hills Grocers all the time. I love them, and now living in Ohio, you cannot find them. No matter what they look like, they are by far one of the best tasting cookies of all time….and lets not forget salt potatoes!

    Reply

  10. Barb
    Jun 27, 2008 @ 11:28:54

    I also grew up in Syracuse right near Green Hills. Now I live in the mid-west and whenever we get back there which isn’t often, we make a trip to Green Hills to get some authentic half-moon cookies. Our mom used to make them too and they were pretty good. When we visited Manhattan last year several of the deli’s sold “black and white” cookies but they were not as good as Green Hills’. We also found some fairly good ones at a Wegmans in Dewitt.
    I wonder if Green Hills would ever ship them? hmmmm.

    Reply

  11. Chris
    Jul 07, 2008 @ 21:08:08

    Did you ever find the recipe? I’m now in SC and grew up in LaFayette and know exactly what your talking about. My parents just came down and brought some down from Mimi’s Bakery in Syracuse. Unfortunately they are no where near as good as they use to be, but it is the true fluffy frosting rather than that glaze junk. There is a recipe in one of Martha Stewats Baking Handbook for the cookie, but never found a good frosting recipe.

    Reply

  12. AINE
    Jul 13, 2008 @ 00:30:39

    Good luck finding your cookie recipe.

    I’d give my eye teeth for the Mohican Market’s DATE NUT BREAD recipe I remember from the 30’s and 40’s!

    Could anyone help me please????????

    Reply

  13. Nancy
    Jul 13, 2008 @ 18:18:15

    I found a recipe at Recipelink.com. Have not tried it yet. It is described as
    Hemstrough Bakery chocolate half moon cookies. They sound right. And you are quite right, those pale imitation black and white cookies are NOT the same.

    Reply

  14. andrew kozak
    Aug 04, 2008 @ 03:49:58

    I grew up in rome, ny and the greatest half moons where made by Hemstroughts bakery. You can get the recipe by going to: http://www.recipelink.com/msgid/1423841
    I have tried this and it is just like buying them at the bakery. It does take a little work but if you want the real thing it is worth it.

    Reply

  15. Cheryl Haver
    Aug 06, 2008 @ 08:52:12

    I’m from Syracuse, right behind Green Hills store. I have a recipe for half-moon cookies that my Syracuse (then) sister-in-law gave me, in 1973. I can buy Black ‘n Whites here in Tallahassee that are pretty good copy cats of the Syracuse half-moons, so I don’t make them but I will post the recipe here for you later today (8/6/08). And you are right, these cookies cannot be covered with plastic or stored on top of one another, successfully.

    Reply

  16. Cheryl Haver
    Aug 06, 2008 @ 09:10:27

    Half Moon Cookies

    1 cup sour milk
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 cup shortening
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp.salt
    3 cups flour
    1tsp. baking powder
    1 tsp. baking
    1 tsp. soda
    1 tsp. vanilla

    Cream sugar and shortening; add eggs; beat well. Sift together flour, baking powder and salt. Add soda to the milk. Add this alternately with the flour mixture; add vanilla. Drop by good-sized tablespoons onto sheets. Bake at 375 degrees for 10 minutes. Frost each with chocolate and vanilla frosting.

    Cheryl Haver

    Reply

  17. Cheryl Haver
    Aug 06, 2008 @ 10:38:53

    I just found a recipe for half-moons in my Moyer’s Corners FD auxiliary cookbook (circa 1987) . It includes a recipe for butter frosting for the cookies. If you want to e-mail me at tallahaver@comcast.net I can send it to you. I can’t figure out how to display it here.

    Reply

  18. Meghan
    Aug 09, 2008 @ 12:39:22

    Half-Moons from Hemstrought's

    Here is a photo of the real thing… From Hemstrought’s in Utica. I grew up in WNY, but plenty of family from Utica. Lots of Half-moons in my childhood, and when we go to the family reunion. My mom took this photo at the reunion in ’07 to rub it in, I couldn’t go. This year there were no half-moons. I’m sure other places in CNY make them, but Hemstrought’s is apparently closed for good, and they are no longer available at Walmart or BJs were they were being sold (that’s the rumor anyway).

    I’ve already downloaded the recipe that andrew links to above, and will try to make some here in Houston.

    Reply

    • jeannine Hoban
      May 05, 2010 @ 16:50:45

      Hi!
      My husband and I own and operate a lovely little bakery in New Hartford , NY. Gingerbread Bake Shop. We really believe that we make the best Halfmoon cookies! Give them a try and we would bet you won’t regret it!!!
      We have two locations in New Hartford. 3991 Oneida Street and New Hartford Shopping Center on Genesee Street.
      Stop in and ask for me, I would be happy to meet you!
      Regards, Jeannine

      Reply

  19. Cheryl Haver
    Aug 11, 2008 @ 16:29:09

    These are looking like the real thing. The big question is what is the real thing recipe? I’m from Syracuse and didn’t have the pleasure of the Hemstrough Bakery. I did…3-4 years ago find a gal who actually made the cookie mix, and shipped it. They were 65%, my half-moon from SYR. I am happy to know you, Houston, I’m in Tallahassee.

    Reply

  20. Michele
    Aug 14, 2008 @ 22:53:06

    I grew up in Rome, but have lived a couple hours north for the past 25+ yrs. I own a restaurant & bakery, and have been imploring my bakers to make half moons. My main baker is from the Albany/Saratoga area, and she made a black & white… (eh, well, some of you have very accurately described the disappointing ‘comparison’) I couldn’t seem to convince her what a fabulous treat a real half moon was, and despite the extraordinarily wonderful creations she produces, try after try, she just didn’t get the half moon – leading me to believe it was just going to be left as an old happy memory. I finally came upon this and several other websites about half moons… YEAH!!! I’m so excited that others share the passion, and that it was, in fact, a pretty regional thing! I, too, came across Hemstrought’s recipelink.com recipe. Whether it is the actual recipe or not, its pretty darned close, and it gave us enough insight to get it right! Between yours and others’ descriptions, we finally have the half moon of my childhood! If anyone visits Potsdam, NY, stop in to Scoopuccino’s and have a half moon!

    Reply

  21. Alice
    Aug 16, 2008 @ 13:42:55

    I’m looking for a half-moon recipe too! It has to be a rich chocolate cookie with fluffy frosting. As I remember I had one and it use sour milk too! I’ll try the one listed above. Many bakeries in Cortland, NY had them when I grew up. I remember the Home Dairy and they had everything!!

    Reply

    • Mary
      Nov 29, 2010 @ 09:58:06

      My husband is also from Cortland and remembers the delicious halfmoons he enjoyed there! When I was growing up, my father worked at Solvay Process (Allied Chemical later) and he would come home from the night shift and sometimes bring them home. I don’t know if they came from Solvay Bakery, but were delicious! I live in Vermont and surprisingly cannot find anything close to what we grew up with. I want to surprise my husband and make them at home.

      Reply

  22. Pam
    Aug 17, 2008 @ 08:15:30

    Thank you all so very much for the recipes! I’ll have to try them! We got out to Green Hills a few weeks ago and I bought half-moon cookies for a picnic (I should have taken a photo) and they were devoured rather quickly! Green Hills is so smart – they put the price label on the bottom of the container so nobody would flip the container over and ruin the frosting. It would be so nice if they would ship them, but I don’t think they’d make it through the shipping in good shape!

    Reply

  23. Pam
    Aug 17, 2008 @ 08:21:55

    Aine – My aunt had a to die for recipe for date nut bread, and I even made it with her once, and when she passed away the recipe passed with her. I will search for the Mohican Market recipe! I love a good date nut bread – there’s nothing like it!!

    Reply

  24. Denise
    Aug 18, 2008 @ 16:21:09

    I stumbled across this website while looking for a real half-moon cookie recipe. I grew up in Ithaca, NY and have great memories of Home Dairy’s half-moon cookies and fried cinnamon rolls. Nice to know that others out there know what a real half-moon is….the black and white cookie just won’t do!

    Reply

  25. Delores Carson
    Aug 19, 2008 @ 15:30:43

    You haven’t had a half-moon cookie until you have one from Harrison Bakery also in Syracuse New York. I wish I could find their recipe. Now that was a half moon cookie. There was also Snowflake Pastry Bakery, but that is no longer there. Man thinking of half moons make me hungry.

    Reply

    • Denise
      Nov 18, 2010 @ 14:24:48

      Has anyone ever get the Harrison Bakery recipe?Im originally rom Syracuse also and used to attend Sacred Heart Church and school cross the street.I remember going to the bakery after sunday mass.Nothing like their half moons or their birthday cakes!

      Reply

  26. Janice Blakely
    Aug 28, 2008 @ 00:50:47

    WOW! I go looking for a simple Half Moon Cookie recipe and find all this nostalgia. I grew up in Poughkeepsie and haven’t had a Half Moon cookie in about 50 years since I was forced to move to Oklahoma. My Mom bought them for us at Mohican’s and I always got them when I was back visiting in NY (Cortland, Syracuse, and LaFayette – cousing lived there). And I have always eaten them the same way Monarch does – black bite, white bite, etc. and zip right down the middle. Now, which recipe do I use???

    Reply

  27. daire
    Aug 30, 2008 @ 21:52:51

    I’m so glad I’m not alone! Another from CNY/Rome here (now in Ohio) who grew up with Hemstrought’s and MAN I miss them! The only version of “black and whites” resemble the above picture. Awful. Thanks for all the leads to recipes! =)

    Reply

  28. Sean R.
    Sep 08, 2008 @ 14:52:43

    Half Moon cookies are so delicious! I haven’t had one in over 27 years though =( I’m originally from Waverly, NY and my grandparents always had Half Moon cookies in the house. Thanks for your post and the great memories.

    -Sean

    Reply

  29. Deborah Coleman
    Sep 20, 2008 @ 09:10:43

    I’m originally from Liverpool, but have lived in Texas for 15 years. I occasionally look for a recipes for half moon cookies and until reading the blog, Ididn’t realize they were a CNY thing. That explains why I have not seen the cookies or recipes anywhere. I’m looking forward to experimenting with a few recipes and introducing my husband and daughter to one of my childhood favorites.

    Reply

  30. Lori
    Oct 07, 2008 @ 22:07:56

    I am also from Ithaca and grew up with the Home Dairy’s half moon cookies. Have never found anything that came close and was absolutely devastated when I went home to visit one year and found they had gone out of business. please let me know if anyone finds the perfect recipe to the perfect half moon cookie.

    Reply

  31. Stacey Wheatley Parker
    Oct 11, 2008 @ 20:47:46

    HALF-MOON COOKIES (HEMSTROUGHT’S BAKERY)
    Source: Saveur Magazine, March 1999

    MAKES ABOUT 30

    Hemstrought’s Bakery generously shared its recipe with us, but we had to adapt the quantities: The original makes 2,400 cookies!

    FOR THE COOKIES:
    3 3/4 cups flour
    3/4 tsp. baking powder
    2 tsp. baking soda
    2 1/4 cup sugar
    16 tbsp. margarine, cut into pieces
    3/4 cup cocoa, sifted
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 eggs
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    1 1/2 cups milk
    FOR THE FUDGE ICING:
    3 1/2 oz. bittersweet chocolate
    3 1/2 oz. semisweet chocolate
    1 tbsp. butter
    4 1/3 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
    2 tbsp. corn syrup
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    Pinch salt
    FOR THE BUTTERCREAM ICING:
    7 cups confectioners’ sugar
    16 tbsp. room temperature butter, cut into pieces
    1/2 cup vegetable shortening
    7 tbsp. milk
    1 tbsp. vanilla extract
    Pinch salt

    FOR THE COOKIES:
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.

    Sift together flour, baking powder, and baking soda in a medium bowl and set aside. Put sugar, margarine, cocoa, and salt in bowl of standing mixer and beat on medium speed until fluffy. Add eggs and vanilla and continue to beat. Add half the milk, then half the flour mixture, beating after each addition until smooth; repeat with remaining milk and flour mixture. Spoon or pipe batter onto parchment-lined baking sheets, making 3-inch rounds 2-inches apart.

    Bake until cookies are set, about 12 minutes. Allow to cool, then remove from parchment.

    FOR THE FUDGE ICING:
    Melt bittersweet and semisweet chocolates and butter in the top of a double boiler over simmering water over medium heat. Add confectioners’ sugar, corn syrup, vanilla, salt, and 6 tbsp. boiling water and mix to a smooth, stiff paste with a rubber spatula. Thin icing with up to 8 tbsp. more boiling water. Icing should fall from a spoon in thick ribbons. Keep icing warm in a double boiler over low heat.

    FOR THE BUTTERCREAM ICING:
    Put sugar, butter, shortening, milk, vanilla, and salt in the bowl of a standing mixer. Beat on low speed to mix, then increase to medium and beat until light and fluffy.

    TO FROST THE COOKIES:
    Using a metal spatula, spread about 1 tbsp. of warm fudge icing on half of the flat side of each cookie. Spread the other half of each cookie with 1 heaping tbsp. buttercream icing.

    Reply

  32. Jaime
    Nov 05, 2008 @ 18:37:15

    Hello there!

    I Just wanted to let you know that my father owns Gingerbread Bake Shop in New Hartford, NY. We make the world’s best halfmoons, hands down. I can personally guarantee that.

    We use white icing (buttercream) and dark chocolate. The way they should be. Never frozen or day old (you can tell by how they taste!). Give us a try, I know anyone who tried would be pleased.

    We are also working on a website to ship them out in the near future.

    🙂

    Reply

    • Dianna
      Sep 29, 2009 @ 13:01:51

      Does the Gingerbread Bake Shop have a website? I would love to order some to be shipped if that’s possible.

      Thanks!

      Reply

  33. Nan
    Nov 11, 2008 @ 12:49:56

    Hello,
    I grew up in the Syracuse, NY area. Almost every Sunday my father would go to Snowflake Baker, in Syracuse. He would buy bagels, onion rolls, black bread – and occasionally we would get half-moon cookies as a special treat. Those cookies are such a huge memory from my childhood! I now live in Arizona and as luck would have it, I have found a bakery here (called “New York West”) and they have all the same kinds of baked goods I grew up on – including half-moon cookies!

    Nan

    Reply

  34. Mary
    Nov 29, 2008 @ 02:18:27

    I also grew up in the Utica/Rome area and remember these cookies from Hemstroughts Bakery. My mother loved them so we would get them a lot when I was a kid. I live in New Orleans now and even though this city is the capital of food, nobody knows what a Half Moon cookie is. I made them and took them to work one day and nobody touched them. I guess they didn’t know what they were missing!

    Reply

  35. Erinn
    Jan 08, 2009 @ 21:56:03

    Hemstrought Bakery is it – hands down – nothing compares
    Berger cookies are horrible, Black and Whites are a waste.

    I found this recipe today… I can’t wait to try it:

    http://www.recipelink.com/cgi/msgbrd/msg_script.pl?printer=1&board=14&thread=23841

    This is the same recipe that is typed out above.

    Reply

  36. cindy
    Jan 16, 2009 @ 20:55:56

    I grew up outside of Syracuse New York and love Half Moon Cookies. I live in California now and I have only seen the kind you described above with the hard icing on them….not even the same. Today I got a box for my birthday and inside….one dozen half moon cookies from Rochester, New York!!!! My sister found them online at a site called NewYorkStyleDeli.com
    Now my only objection would be they are chocolate cake but the frosting is the best so I didn’t even mind. They are around 18.00 a dozen plus shipping and they came in a cold packed box, 3 to a container. I ate two while I was talking on the phone thanking her….I think you will like them.

    Reply

  37. Tami
    Jan 20, 2009 @ 00:16:47

    Thanks, Ladies, for sharing all of these recipes! My husband is from Chittenango, NY and grew up eating the Half Moon cookies his Mom made. I met him in Pa and now we live in NC where we still can’t find the perfect half moon cookie! We came close the other day at Ferrucci’s Old Tyme Italian Market, although they called them black and whites (and they are from NY!). My husband said that they were close to the real thing. 😉

    I’m going to try the bakery recipe that’s printed here. I hope that he likes them!

    Reply

  38. Tim G.
    Apr 03, 2009 @ 19:05:52

    Oh my gosh! Now I am REALLY craving a half moon. I grew up in Ithaca, NY, and ate half moons and home fries at the Home Dairy on the commons weekly. I miss them terribly. I need the recipe! I might just have to break my rule about flying and head back to Ithaca from my home in Indianapolis……

    Reply

  39. Jen Davis
    May 19, 2009 @ 16:15:18

    I too grew up in Ithaca. I was introduced to Half Moons by my english teacher Ms. Jacobsen, afet a very bad day at school. The Home Dairy made the best by far! Sadly the Home Dairy was sold and is now a restaurant. No more Half Moon Cookies.

    Reply

  40. Jen Davis
    May 19, 2009 @ 16:15:58

    I too grew up in Ithaca. I was introduced to Half Moons by my english teacher Ms. Jacobsen, after a very bad day at school. The Home Dairy made the best by far! Sadly the Home Dairy was sold and is now a restaurant. No more Half Moon Cookies.

    Reply

  41. Ybbagail Smith
    Aug 11, 2009 @ 17:32:47

    I love half moon cookies. But in Western Ny we have the kind with the icing you say you don’t like.

    Reply

  42. Larry Gorman
    Sep 06, 2009 @ 14:20:57

    I have to echo Cheryl’s recipe – it is Harrison’s Bakery’s recipe. My wife and I grew up in Syracuse and now live in NYC – Black and White cookies? In NYC???? Yuccchhh….NOTHING like Harrison Half Moons! My wife uses the same recipe and the cookie is soft and cakelike, the frosting a nice buttercreamy consistency that does form a bit of a “crust” – again, JUST like Harrison’s. She has made them for family gatherings here in NYC with friends and the NYC people are dumbfounded – the BEST “black and white” cookie they have EVER had. Harrison could make a MINT flying their cookies every morning to NYC and sellling them here.

    Hemstrought’s cookies call for cocoa – true half moons are vanilla cake. True Harrison had chocolated ones but they were outsold by the vanilla many times over.

    Chekc out Cheryl Haver’s recipe – 8/8/08 – it is the REAL thing ladies.

    Reply

    • Christian Behr
      Oct 07, 2010 @ 15:56:23

      I am a chef and food historian and I have to say that the first half moon cookies on record are chocolate based, not vanilla. I grew up with both and like the vanilla ones. I serve them in my restaurant, but after 2 years of research for my cookbook I have to admit the true ones are the coco.

      Reply

  43. Larry Gorman
    Sep 06, 2009 @ 14:26:10

    Frosting recipe
    Chocolate Icing:
    3 cups confectioners’ sugar
    6 tablespoons cocoa
    4 tablespoons melted butter
    1 tsp. vanilla
    Combine all ingredients in a mixer and beat until smooth.

    White Icing:
    Combine in a mixing bowl and beat until creamy:

    3 cups confectioners’ sugar
    6 tablespoons softened butter
    Add and beat until smooth:

    3 to 5 tablespoons milk
    1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla
    Dash of salt.

    Reply

  44. Sandy
    Oct 25, 2009 @ 11:33:00

    Yeah…I’m a happy camper now! Grew up in Lyncourt (Syracuse) and farther north in Altmar. My great-grandmother from Booneville made the best half-moons and I’ve lost her recipe. Cheryl’s is it! Nothing better! Black and Whites are simply nothing worth eating!Thank you! I’m off to get baking.

    Reply

  45. Trackback: Half-Moons, revisted « Nature Woman
  46. Maria
    Apr 03, 2010 @ 08:33:56

    I am trying to find the ultimate half moon cookie recipe! My grandmother made awesome ones, but lost the recipe she used. I’ve tried several, and cannot get the fluffy white cake-cookie to turn out both fluffy and delicious! I will try the recipe listed here – I hope it works out well!

    I’m a CNYer too… grew up in Moravia… live in Auburn… work in Ithaca! 🙂

    Reply

  47. Emily
    Apr 28, 2010 @ 19:54:38

    I live in Syracuse, NY and have been baking for over 30 years. I have been looking for the Half-Moon cookie recipe for quite a while. Whenever I test a recipe I buy a couple of Harrison’s cookies. Cheryl’s recipe is close, but it’s not Harrison’s.

    Reply

  48. Colette Grower
    Jun 04, 2010 @ 22:21:03

    You can purchase half moons from Holland Farms Bakery in Whitesboro, NY near Utica. They will mail them.

    Reply

  49. Verna Broekhuizen
    Jul 05, 2010 @ 12:37:19

    I also grew up in central NYS. My parents always did their grocery shopping on Friday nights and we walked by a small bakery. I was often given a half-moon cookie when my parents bought other items. After I grew up and moved away from NYS, I didn’t see or hear of half-moon cookies again, until after I was married. My husband grew up in the Syracuse area and his parents relocated to Liverpool in 1975. There is a lovely small family grocery in Liverpool called Nichols…and we always got a cookie for each of us and each of our daughters when we visited. It is still a tradition to go to Nichols and get half-moon cookies when we visit my dad-in-law. Our girls are all grown now and live in NC and the DC area, but they still enjoy these delicious cookies when we can get them. My husband and I live in the Indy area…where at The Indy 500 Race Time we often see Black and White cookies…but they are not good at all. I am going to try to make some half-moon cookies from the recipes listed above and hope I find something yummy and close to the ones I love!

    Reply

  50. Lara
    Aug 04, 2010 @ 01:31:30

    Oh, no, guys. I’m confused. I found one on allrecipes.com that said they were THE recipe==

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Black-and-White-Cookies-I/Detail.aspx#

    But I see the recipe above is with a chocolate cookie. I want to surprise my husband who is from Elmira and is currently deployed to the Middle East. I want to bake them for him, but I don’t want to ruin the surprise by asking which is right. Can you guys help me?

    Reply

  51. Nancy Fleming
    Sep 05, 2010 @ 08:46:46

    I grew up in Nedrow, NY I now live in Houston Texas and have for 30 years. Many, many trips to New York over the years never ended without making sure I had room in my suitcase to take as many half moons as I could fit. My daughters would fight over them when I arrived home. Growing up my sister & I resolved the fight. She loved the white, I loved the chocolate, so we’d split em! Any visitors you come to TX to see me know the toll to enter my home it make sure you have Half moons in your bag! Thanks for the wonderful years of great cookies & awesome memories.

    Reply

    • Linda Stanton Erskine
      Dec 16, 2010 @ 23:33:40

      This has been so great to read all these letters from people that have loved the half-moon cookies in the Syracuse area. Your letter caught my attention, because you said you grew up in Nedrow. That’s where I grew up, too. What was your maiden name? Did you graduate from OCS? What year?

      Reply

      • carol arena{DiNuzzo]
        Apr 19, 2012 @ 12:14:35

        hi linda, my first question to you would be, did you live on elton ave? if so i lived accross the street from you, do you remembers the DiNuzzo’s this is carol.

  52. Bonnie
    Oct 03, 2010 @ 17:20:30

    Hi
    I have been making these for years. I don’t know about the bakery mentioned above but when I make them I use chocolate cake mix( as my introduction to half moons was a chocolate base) mix the cake as directed on the box and add 1 cup of flour to make the batter thick enough to not run all over your cookie sheet. Bake for about 10-13 minutes at 350 degrees and frost with you favorite vanilla and chocolate frosting recipe
    my kids love them and my hubby opts for a batch of these against a chocolate cake anyday of the week

    Reply

  53. Mary
    Nov 01, 2010 @ 23:07:02

    I grew up in Elmira, NY and loved the Half Moon Cookies from Light’s Bakery and the old Mohican Market. I remember as a little girl walking into the Mohican with my grandmother and smelling all the wonderful smells, including fresh ground coffee.

    I make Half Moon Cookies and they are a family favorite. There are very few that come close to what I remember having as a child. The cookies at Light’s Bakery are very good, but don’t have the same special quality as I remember.

    Reply

  54. Don
    Nov 20, 2010 @ 15:24:21

    I grew up on Syracuse near SU and when we had half moons, they came from Snowflake Bakery. To me, they were the best. When Snowflake closed, I went to Harrison’s in Dewitt and they were close. Now with Harrison’s gone, the only place I can find them is Wegmen’s which are a poor substitute. I live in northeast Ohio and have not found any here at all. I have collected a number of recipes from the internet (including the Hemstrought’s above) and plan on starting to make them for myself. I seem remember that Snowflake used more of a glaze than a frosting so I will have to experiment with frosting to find what suits me best.

    Reply

  55. Denise
    Dec 28, 2010 @ 05:21:40

    Hello…. I understand about the 1/2 moon cookies. I live in NC during the summer and spend the school year in Egypt. I wanted my children to try some….to create childhood memories. My Mother would get us one at the Wegmans bakery..to keep us quiet while we shopped. (on Erie Blvd…Syracuse NY) Maybe they can help you? If you do find a Real recipe let me know. 🙂 Thanks !

    Reply

  56. charmaine
    Jan 01, 2011 @ 10:52:58

    I grew up in the Syracuse area and rember half moon cookies with divided cake. Half vanilla and half chocolate. And reverse frosting on the top. They were to me the best. I now live in Florida and Publix”s sell
    a cookie called Black and White. But not very good at all.
    The cookie I remember came form Harrison’s Bakery in Syracuse,N.Y.
    I’m sorry to here it closed

    Reply

  57. Gigi
    Jan 06, 2011 @ 14:50:25

    FYI… Harrison Bakery in Syracuse, NY is NOT closed. I was on FB today and a high school friend posted pictures of the Half Moon Cookies she bought at Harrison Bakery this morning. Made me miss them so I went looking for a recipe and found this site. Going to try Cheryl’s recipe w/Larry’s Frosting this weekend 🙂

    Thanks~
    Gigi
    Havana (Tallahassee), FL

    Reply

  58. Pam
    Jan 10, 2011 @ 00:17:45

    I grew up on the Half-Moon cookies from Green Hills Farms, and after all of the suggestions above, I tried other bakeries, and I still have to say, Green Hills Farms has the best Half-Moon cookies to me. I’ll have to try some of your recipe suggestions to see if I can make them like Green Hills Farms, since they don’t always have the chocolate based ones that I really love! And their sour cream donuts are excellent, too.

    Reply

  59. Laura
    Feb 16, 2011 @ 23:05:12

    Hi,
    I grew up in South Boston, MA, where, I am afraid, we called them, “Half and Halves”. Hayden’s Bakery on N and 4th Streets had yummy ones. They were NEVER made with chocolate cake, but had the requisite buttercream frosting. I have found some with a lemon cake base – YUK! My father-in-law is from NYC and we are both now living on PEI in Canada, so I would love to make them for him and can’t wait to try some of these recipes. Thanks.

    Reply

  60. jeannine Hoban
    Feb 17, 2011 @ 19:46:12

    Seriously, we are so proud and dedicated to preserving the rich texture of the chocolate cookie and creamy buttercream icing that we use exclusively on our Halfmoon cookies. This recipe has been tweaked, down through the years to our high standards are sure you will find them sinfully satisfying. yummmmmm!
    We are proud to say that our ‘Moons” have been all over the world and even comforting some of our wonderful men and women in the service of our country here and overseas. Thank you to all of the brave men and women protecting our soil.
    Give us a call and order one or a dozen, we are happy to put them aside for you as they run out quickly!
    Gingerbread Bake Shop
    3991 Oneida Street, New Hartford, NY 13413 315-737-5460

    Gingerbread Bake Shop 2
    New Hartford Shopping Center
    Genesee Street
    New Hartford, NY 13413 315-798-1250

    Reply

    • Kate J
      May 05, 2012 @ 01:27:41

      Wish I had looked up half moons sooner. I was just up in Utica on 4/28/12. Will have to stop by next time.

      Reply

  61. Barb
    Mar 11, 2011 @ 15:23:57

    I”m with you – I now live in the Bopston area but grew up on Hemstrought’s Bakery half moon cookies – can’t find anything close nor have I tried to replicate yet, but am thinking a whoopie pie base is the way to go for starters! My aunt used to work there and while she never got the recipe, she did say the white fluffy frosting had a good amount of vegetable shoprteneing in it.

    Reply

  62. debi
    Apr 04, 2011 @ 14:36:56

    I think I’m going to try the recipe posted above, I am originally from Oneida NY, and now live in Rochester NY. I’ve looked for these in other states and was surprised they didn’t know what they were.

    I found this info online:
    Half-Moons originated in Pittsford, NY at the famous Pittsford Dairy in the early part of the 20th century. Half-Moons most often come with a chocolate cake base, dark fudge icing on one side and sugary white frosting for the “half moon” side. Hemstrought’s (Clinton, NY) also made a vanilla cake base with fudge and white frosting, as well as full ‘vanilla moons’ and ‘coconut moons,’ with either a chocolate or vanilla cake base. The original Hemstrought’s half moons bakery closed their doors a few years ago (date needed), however they still bake half moons for local supermarkets, where they are still available. When the bakery closed, the family sold the name only to a local commercial bakery for the supermarket production of half moons, while the actual recipe remained with the bakery staff who now opened their own bakery, Gingerbread Bake Shop, on Onieda St in Washington Mills, NY.

    Reply

  63. Erin
    May 05, 2011 @ 21:38:00

    You’ve made my day. I live in Texas but I remember the days of stopping at Green Hills Farms when I was a kid. Now when I go home, I actually hit either Sams (oddly enough) or the Nice-N-Easy in Tully. I hate black and white cookies but they’ve made their way to Austin. I need to open up a bakery here and make half moon cookies!

    Reply

  64. Nick
    Jun 11, 2011 @ 15:38:36

    I really enjoyed reading all about half moons, and hearing all of you talk about your memories of CNY…I grew up in Syracuse…Eastwood area and half moons were always part of our life. I used to look for recipes, but never found what I thought was exactly like we had when we were kids…like from Mohicans…(we had one in Eastwood), Rasmussens and the incredible Cottage Bakery in downtown and of course Snowflake.Does any one remember Kelfelz on Geddes St. Harrisons is still across from Sacred Heart on Genesee St. but it is unfortunately only a shadow of what it used to be? l lived in NYC and discovered the black and white too…horrible…not worth buying. I will have to try one from this blog. I’ve also never come across a recipe for a Winedrop which used to be a favorite as well or that wonderful anise flavored cookie called Suzzanes! My best regards to all of you

    Reply

  65. Irishyank
    Jul 16, 2011 @ 07:34:49

    Hi,
    I grew up in Auburn, NY, and my mother always bought Half Moons at the Mohican Market on Genesee St. or at Rose Bakery. When she sent me to the bakery, which was a block from our house, I loved it because I’d stay in the bakery long after I was waited on just to smell everything baking. I made Half Moons yesterday from a MS recipe. They were good but just not the same. The recipe called for vanilla AND lemon extract. Next time I’ll leave out the lemon.

    Reply

  66. Vern
    Dec 12, 2011 @ 10:28:02

    I too LOOOOVE real halfmoon cookies. I grew up on the ones from Green Hills Farms. I still get them when ever I visit home. I miss and love the fried haddock on Friday’s, sandwiches from The Brooklyn Pickle, Byrne Dairy ice cream, Byrne Dairy chocolate milk, and cooney’s (white hotdog) from Heid’s in Liverpool (to name a few) as well, but that’s another topic. I did find a Jewish Bakery on Briar Cliff Rd in Atlanta that has halfmoon cookies that taste just like the ones from Green Hills! The are amazing!

    Reply

  67. Nancy clark
    Dec 12, 2011 @ 16:39:20

    I tried recently contacting Harrison bakery for the half moon cookie.. Unfortunately they don’t ship orders out:( I’m only 25 but grew up in upstate newyork and half moons were always a family favorite.. But ya I can’t find an exact recipe either.

    Reply

  68. Tammy
    Jan 04, 2012 @ 23:39:13

    It’s been fun reading all these posts when I was just looking for a half-moon cookie recipe! I grew up in Chittenango, NY and now live in Rochester. When I get a craving for a half-moon I’ll get some at Wegmans. They are good, but not great. My sister makes good ones too, but, shhh, not great! Great half-moon cookies and donuts were at Lynch’s Bakery, next to the Canteen restaurant!!! My sister and I are on a mission to find or make something close to theirs! Thanks to all who shared recipes. I can’t wait to try them!

    Reply

  69. crystal
    Jan 12, 2012 @ 13:15:18

    hello. years ago i was given a easy recipe for the half moons cookies, it took cake mix, sour cream and a couple other ingredients, there is like 5 i think. plus u can frost with cheap frosting. i am having troubles finding it or any easy recipes to do with my granddaughter. thank you for your help.

    Reply

  70. Ken Blye
    Feb 15, 2012 @ 06:14:10

    I grew up near Ithaca, NY and loved the Home Dairy’s Fried Cinnamon Rolls. Where can I get some? the recipe for the bun? and the yummy frosting?
    IHS Class of 62 now in Orlando.

    Reply

  71. Judith (Hertel) Roquet
    Apr 03, 2012 @ 19:04:19

    I remember green Hills half moon cookies, having grown up in Syracuse. They were the best. I lived in Mass. and NH and have never found any as delicious. I also remember Heid’s cooney’s. I always thought it was the mustard that made them taste so wonderful. I do not know what kind of mustard it was. Is Heid’s still there?

    Reply

    • Cheryl (Demong) Haver
      Apr 16, 2012 @ 14:34:45

      Judy—Hello, Girl—–I’m your old neighborhood classmate ( Cheryl Demong Haver, from Ostrander Ave, and McKinley Grammar, then St. Anthony’s.) I remember your house right near McKinley Park…..remember Chuck Virginia? you can e-mail me @tallahaver@comcast.net.

      Reply

    • Anne
      Aug 26, 2012 @ 20:17:53

      Judith, Heid’s is still there, and they’ve grown a bit. Me, I just buy Hoffman’s

      Reply

  72. Char Rich
    Apr 21, 2012 @ 16:43:10

    I can remember going to the Home Dairy in Ithaca NY as a young kid with my Grandmother. They had what I would say was the BEST half moon cookies & cinnamon buns in our area. I came on here looking for a recipe for half moons because my father in law and husband have been asking me for a while now to bake some. If anyone has the recipe or knows how to get it for the half moons from the Ithaca Home Dairy I would love to have it.

    Reply

  73. Kate J
    May 05, 2012 @ 01:25:33

    Half moon cookies are originally from Utica NY

    Reply

  74. Becki T
    May 28, 2012 @ 16:11:26

    Here is ther Recipe!
    Home Dairy Half Moon Cookies

    2 c brown sugar
    1 c margarine (do not use butter)
    2 eggs
    4 oz baking chocolate, melted
    3 c flour
    1 tsp baking soda
    1 c milk
    1 tsp vanilla

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

    Cream the sugar and margarine. Add eggs, one at a time. Add the melted chocolate.
    Combine the flour and baking soda and add alternately with the milk, beginning and ending with the dry ingredients. Add the vanilla.

    Using a cookie scoop that holds about a quarter cup, scoop onto a greased cookie sheet. Lightly press them down with the back of a spoon.
    Bake for 14 1/2 minutes. It is important not to underbake- or to overbake. You may need to experiment a little with the time if your oven is not accurate, or if you make them a different size. You do not want them to collapse after you take them out of the oven.

    Makes 2 dozen large (4 inch diameter) cookies.

    Frosting:
    Use this frosting, not a substitute. You will need 2 batches.

    4 c powdered sugar
    1/2 c margarine
    1 tsp vanilla
    milk
    1 oz unsweetened chocolate, melted – if you like more chocolate use 2 oz.

    Combine powdered sugar with margarine. Add vanilla, and enough milk to make a spreadable frosting. I used about three tablespoons or so of milk.
    Make a second batch of the frosting and add melted chocolate to half.

    When the cookies are completely cool, frost the bottom side half and half with the vanilla and chocolate frostings.

    Reply

  75. a567and8
    Jul 30, 2012 @ 05:42:00

    And thanks, Peg for that image of the Mohican Supermarket ad! My father used to work at the Mohican. I would go with him sometimes when he went to work in the morning on a Saturday. He would bake glazed donuts and I could eat them directly from the glazing process, still hot! I don’t remember buying half moons there but as you can see from the ad, they cost about 2 1/2 cents apiece. Ummm! For that part of good old days. The bad part was that my Dad couldn’t be a member of the union as a “Baker” because he was an African American. I would be sent by my mother to pay his union dues as a “Baker’s Helper”. Time has marched on and we’ve righted some injustices. Bravo! Now if we can get women payed as much as men…..!

    Reply

  76. karen
    Sep 05, 2012 @ 17:27:44

    I too am from syracuse and think the best half moons were at the old Mondo’s bakery in North Syracuse. I worked there in the 70’s and they were by far the best i ever had and have been unable to find any like them since….

    Reply

  77. Mary C. Hubbell
    Nov 26, 2012 @ 15:05:43

    HALF-MOON COOKIES (HEMSTROUGHT’S BAKERY)
    Source: Saveur Magazine, March 1999

    MAKES ABOUT 30

    Hemstrought’s Bakery generously shared its recipe with us, but we had to adapt the quantities: The original makes 2,400 cookies!

    FOR THE COOKIES:
    3 3/4 cups flour
    3/4 tsp. baking powder
    2 tsp. baking soda
    2 1/4 cup sugar
    16 tbsp. margarine, cut into pieces
    3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted
    1/4 tsp. salt
    2 eggs
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    1 1/2 cups milk

    FOR THE FUDGE ICING:
    3 1/2 oz. bittersweet chocolate
    3 1/2 oz. semisweet chocolate
    1 tbsp. butter
    4 1/3 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
    2 tbsp. corn syrup
    1 tsp. vanilla extract
    Pinch salt

    FOR THE BUTTERCREAM ICING:
    7 cups confectioners’ sugar
    16 tbsp. room temperature butter, cut into pieces
    1/2 cup vegetable shortening
    7 tbsp. milk
    1 tbsp. vanilla extract
    Pinch salt

    FOR THE COOKIES:
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper.

    Sift together flour, baking powder, and baking soda in a medium bowl and set aside. Put sugar, margarine, cocoa, and salt in bowl of standing mixer and beat on medium speed until fluffy. Add eggs and vanilla and continue to beat. Add half the milk, then half the flour mixture, beating after each addition until smooth; repeat with remaining milk and flour mixture. Spoon or pipe batter onto parchment-lined baking sheets, making 3-inch rounds 2-inches apart.

    Bake until cookies are set, about 12 minutes. Allow to cool, then remove from parchment.

    FOR THE FUDGE ICING:
    Melt bittersweet and semisweet chocolates and butter in the top of a double boiler over simmering water over medium heat. Add confectioners’ sugar, corn syrup, vanilla, salt, and 6 tbsp. boiling water and mix to a smooth, stiff paste with a rubber spatula. Thin icing with up to 8 tbsp. more boiling water. Icing should fall from a spoon in thick ribbons. Keep icing warm in a double boiler over low heat.

    FOR THE BUTTERCREAM ICING:
    Put sugar, butter, shortening, milk, vanilla, and salt in the bowl of a standing mixer. Beat on low speed to mix, then increase to medium and beat until light and fluffy.

    TO FROST THE COOKIES:
    Using a metal spatula, spread about 1 tbsp. of warm fudge icing on half of the flat side of each cookie. Spread the other half of each cookie with 1 heaping tbsp. buttercream icing.

    Reply

  78. Gruppie Girl
    Mar 09, 2013 @ 08:14:19

    I always assumed half moons stared in the Boston area. In Boston, they always have a vanilla base. When I first moved to CT and ordered a “half moon”, they looked at me like I was a loon. Turns out they are called “black and whites” around here. Regional differences, even when geographically close, can be funny.

    Reply

  79. jean rust
    Aug 22, 2013 @ 07:45:07

    thy Leggiero shared Arthur Bicknell’s photo.
    If and when I ever decide to cheat a little, I have Donald Darling to thank for posting this recipe for the famous HOME DAIRY HALF MOON COOKIES that were such an IMPORTANT part of my childhood. As Donald says in @[262262727117526:69:You Know You Grew Up in Ithaca, NY if…] “after school us girls/boys would stop and purchase them on the way home.” Ingredients: 2 cups Brown Sugar, 1 c. Margarine, 3 c. Flour, 4 oz. Baking Chocolate, 2 Eggs, 1 tsp. Vanilla, 1 tsp. Baking Soda, 1 c. Milk Directions: Cream Sugar and Margarine. Beat in Eggs and Chocolate (which has been melted). Add Milk alternating with Flour & Baking Soda. Add Vanilla. Drop mixture by heaping tbsp. on to greased cookie sheet. Spread batter lightly. Bake at 350 degrees- for 10 minutes. Cool and frost curved side of the cookies. For the Frosting: you can buy a can of Betty Crocker Milk Chocolate Frosting and a can of White Frosting or the following: Directions: Combine 4 c. Confectionery Sugar, 1/2 c. Margarine. Add 1 tsp. Vanilla and enough Milk to make spreading consistency, frost 1/2 of one side of the cookies with white. Add 2 squares of melted Chocolate to remaining frosting and frost the other half of the cookies with the chocolate frosting.
    If and when I ever decide to cheat a little, I have Donald Darling to thank for posting this recipe for the famous HOME DAIRY HALF MOON COOKIES that were such an IMPORTANT part of my childhood. As Donald says in You Know You Grew Up in Ithaca, NY if… “after school us girls/boys would stop and purchase them on the way home.”

    Ingredients: 2 cups Brown Sugar, 1 c. Margarine, 3 c. Flour, 4 oz. Baking Chocolate, 2 Eggs, 1 tsp. Vanilla, 1 tsp. Baking Soda, 1 c. Milk
    Directions: Cream Sugar and Margarine. Beat in Eggs and Chocolate (which has been melted). Add Milk alternating with Flour & Baking Soda. Add Vanilla. Drop mixture by heaping tbsp. on to greased cookie sheet. Spread batter lightly. Bake at 350 degrees- for 10 minutes. Cool and frost curved side of the cookies.
    For the Frosting: you can buy a can of Betty Crocker Milk Chocolate Frosting and a can of White Frosting or the following:
    Directions: Combine 4 c. Confectionery Sugar, 1/2 c. Margarine. Add 1 tsp. Vanilla and enough Milk to make spreading consistency, frost 1/2 of one side of the cookies with white. Add 2 squares of melted Chocolate to remaining frosting and frost the other half of the cookies with the chocolate frosting.

    Reply

  80. Meredith
    Oct 15, 2013 @ 11:30:02

    Does anyone have Holland Farms Recipe for the Half Moons? I’ve eaten those since a little kid, and now most of my family lives in NC. I know they ship half moons, but I wanted to try and make them too.

    Reply

  81. oruba
    Oct 21, 2013 @ 17:54:41

    The half moon cookies (I grew up calling em cake) originate the same place I do, Utica, NY. Just Google Hemstrought’s Bakery in Utica and you should find the history and the original recipe. I moved to Cleveland when I was in high school and never realized the cookies were unique to my hometown and was shocked that kids around the US didn’t grow up eating these heavenly treats like I did. That’s what I call good fortune for me 🙂

    Reply

  82. Jim Towner
    Nov 15, 2013 @ 01:05:33

    I have heard that my grandfather, a baker at the Mohican Bakery in Elmira, NY originated these half moon cookies. Having lived through the Depression, he did not want icing to go to waste, so put it on cookies along with chocolate he had left to use it up.

    Reply

  83. Andrea
    Nov 30, 2013 @ 00:26:33

    Hi, my family and I ran The Home Dairy in Ithaca, NY, before it became the Matte Factor. Some of my fondest memories are of making the half-moon cookies, face cookies, and the fried cinnamon rolls.with my brother, who now runs The Carriage House Cafe in Ithaca. We enjoyed reading all the posts!

    Reply

    • Ken Blye
      Mar 22, 2014 @ 12:17:14

      Hi Andrea,
      My Dad ,Warren Blye, used to work at Rothschilds. Fond memories of coming through the side alley in the back way for breakfast and of course the fried cinnamon roles. BTW Do you have the recipe for the rolls? Does anyone(your brother?) still bake them? We live in Florida and used to freeze a dozen and bring them back on the plane. I was in heaven. Ken

      Reply

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