Sonnenberg Gardens

On Labor Day we went to Sonnenberg Gardens. I love my blog because I was able to look up the last time I went to Sonnenberg Gardens, and it was over two years ago. That’s just wrong. I usually go at least once a year, if not more.

It’s always fun to start with the trial gardens. I didn’t get the names of anything, just photos:
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These are so cool – some kind of ornamental kale:
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The beds in front of the conservatory are beautiful, as always:
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We went into the Cactus House and saw tons of cactii, but I won’t bore you with all of the photos, just this little one with red fruit:
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We moved on into the Orchid House, and I will bore you with a post of the flowers later:
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This year, among other things, I focused in on all of the statuary that we saw:
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They had a special Hydrangea House display by Wayside Gardens:
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I love hydrangeas:
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A beautiful lily in the Japanese Garden:
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Some beautiful lichen on a rock:
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I don’t remember this statue being cleaned up last time I was at Sonnenberg:
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This is what is above the statue:
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I also don’t remember this one being cleaned up:
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I love symmetry:
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We used to be able to walk under this one:
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The Ice House. Have I mentioned I love my wide-angle lens?
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This same photo taken with a regular camera:
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The Carriage House:
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I love being able to capture the Italian Gardens without having to stitch photos together:
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Elevator in the really dark foyer which is as wide as this door – ack!
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Ohhh, ahhh, more beautiful statuary:
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More cool symmetry:
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And just when I was getting ready to take an awesome photo of the entire house, my battery decided it was done, so this was taken with a regular camera:
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ID of Photographic Prints #1: Cyanotype

Notes from class “History and Identification of Paper, Print, and Photographic Processes,” taught by Gary E. Albright at the Rochester Regional Library Council.

Cyanotype: 1880-1029, blue image color.
A true photograph, one layer structure with no binder, no baryta layer.   Image lies in top layer of paper, paper fibers are clearly visible, has a matte surface.

693 - Yates Castle 75 - 300dpi
Courtesy of Onondaga Historical Association, Photograph Store Image #693, Yates Castle grounds

The cyanotypes I have “handled” are thin and fragile.   Note not to confuse cyanotypes with dyed photos.