Kimonos

Yesterday we went to the Memorial Art Gallery to see the ‘Fashioning Kimono: Art Deco and Modernism in Japan’ exhibition. I really didn’t know what to expect, but was pleasantly surprised at their beauty! It made me want to buy one in the gift shop, except they’re very expensive!  I couldn’t take photos since it isn’t a permanent exhibit, but here’s some photos here:

Uchikake
This is something like what we saw, but the ones we saw were pressed nice and smooth.

From the website:

Nearly 100 extraordinary examples of kimono created between the 1890s and the 1950s tell the story of how Japan’s traditional national dress was influenced by technological advances in silk production and exposure to Western cultures. Included are everyday garments; intricately embroidered ceremonial robes; boys’ kimono stenciled with cars, airplanes and battleships; and colorful examples with Art Deco patterns that heralded the emergence of Japan’s “new woman.” All are drawn from the famed Montgomery Collection in Lugano, Switzerland.

From the press release:

ROCHESTER, NY — Well into the last century, Japan’s traditional national dress—the
kimono—was worn by men, women and children of all social classes. Deceptively simple in
concept—a one-piece, front-wrap garment with a straight silhouette—the kimono lent itself
to endless variations in color, pattern and design that signaled age, gender, status, occasion,
even the change of seasons.
A nationally touring exhibition that opens January 31 at the Memorial Art Gallery features
nearly 100 extraordinary examples from the famed Montgomery Collection in Lugano,
Switzerland. Fashioning Kimono: Art Deco and Modernism in Japan brings together everyday
garments; intricately embroidered ceremonial robes; boys’ kimono stenciled with cars,
airplanes and battleships; and colorful Art Deco patterns heralding the emergence of Japan’s “new woman.”
All were created between the 1890s and the 1950s, a dynamic period when technological advances in silk making and the influence of Western styles resulted in an explosion of bold and vibrant designs.
This period was also to be the last era of the “living” kimono. After World War II, more affordable Western
clothing became the norm, though the kimono continues to be worn for formal events such as weddings and funerals, and increasingly as a fashion statement.
Fashioning Kimono is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, VA. Support for the national tour and catalog has been provided by The E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. In Rochester, the exhibition is made possible by the Gallery Council of the Memorial Art Gallery and the Robert L. and Mary L. Sproull Fund.

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Jayne
    Apr 14, 2010 @ 06:49:59

    I can imagine that the fabrics and colors were just breathtaking Pam!

    Reply

  2. sandy
    Apr 16, 2010 @ 17:19:43

    Hey Pam, you sew, don’t you? I have seen several patterns to make them. The quilting shops even have some beautiful fabric. My sister had a peach silk one, that a friend in the navy brought her from Japan. Now, I am wondering if she still has it?

    Reply

  3. Pam
    Apr 19, 2010 @ 12:14:08

    Jayne – They were!!

    Sandy – Yes, I do! I’ll have to check out the patterns. They look so comfortable. I saw some fabric in the quilt shop we just stopped at that would make a good kimono.

    Reply

  4. Arts Entertainment
    May 07, 2010 @ 05:26:04

    Hi! Just wanna say I like your posting on this Kimonos article.
    I think it’s interesting..
    Surely, i will read your next postings.Keep up the good work!!

    a.e. (“,)

    Reply

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